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The 15 Best Metal Guitars – Options for Every Budget

08/07/2024

Featured image: Creative Commons License by Alfred Nitsch

Metal is a broad church and an expansive genre that covers a huge range of musical styles. Whatever your preferred flavour of the Good Stuff is, it’ll typically be characterised by heavy distortion, energetic playing, and technical lead lines.

So, if you need a new shred machine to make the drop tunings easier, the chugs meatier, and the sweep-picking solos sweepier, read our guide to the best metal guitars with options for every budget!

We have choices that cover extended range, active and passive pickups, and gloriously pointy aggressive shapes to create the meanest aesthetics.

In a hurry?

Here are our top five metal guitars:

ESP LTD EC-201Sleek, simple design with a powerful single pickupCheck current price
Cort KX307MSAffordable 7-string multi-scale guitar with powerful pickupsCheck current price
Schecter Omen-8Extended range 8-string guitar with excellent articulationCheck current price
Fender Jim Root TelecasterCombines classic Telecaster design with modern metal featuresCheck current price
G4M 734 Pro BaritoneHigh-output baritone guitar with a unique burl finishCheck current price

The best metal guitars

1. ESP LTD EC-201

ESP LTD EC-201, Black SatinKey features

  • Single ESP-designed LH-150B bridge pickup
  • Extended cutaway design
  • All satin-black finish

Pros

  • Super slim ESP neck with U shape makes for effortless speedy playing
  • One pickup keeps things focused and tight – no accidental pickup switches or tone/volume adjustments
  • Vintage-meets-metal design combines the best of both worlds

Cons

  • Single pickup might not have the range of tones for players who prefer a wider palette and versatility

If you need an all-out metal guitar to do a job in just about any heavy band, the EC-201 is your saviour. Nothing too fancy, just a well-built, solid instrument that’s easy to play and extract monster tones from.

Sporting a Matrix-style satin black finish laid over the classic single-cut Eclipse body shape, it’s a super comfy design for any player who prefers the vintage shape. Its extended cutaway makes accessing those high frets a breeze, while ESP’s super thin U-shaped neck keeps your playing and movement around the fretboard lightning fast.

A single pickup design should be at the top of the list for many metal purists. That’s because it keeps things clean and simple while you’re playing; no accidental flicks of a pickup selector, or hitting extraneous volume or tone knobs. After all, most guitarists will stick to the bridge in heavier genres for its extra bite and punch.

Finished off with a TOM-style bridge for extra easy string changes and super accurate intonation, the EC-201 is an instrument that’ll fit into many budgets and will be a proper metal workhorse throughout all sub-genres and playing styles.


2. Cort KX307MS

Cort KX307MS, Open Pore MahoganyKey features

  • 7-String multi-Scale (25.5” – 27”)
  • PowerBar humbucker set
  • Roasted maple neck and fretboard

Pros

  • High-quality and low-cost entry to the world of multi-scale, extended-range guitars
  • Chunky yet articulate response from Cort humbuckers
  • Roasted maple neck construction will help maintain string tension with resistance to humidity and moisture

Cons

  • Extended-range and multi-scale instruments aren’t for everyone and are certainly more complex than standard 6-strings

Have you seen your favourite metal influencer/producer on the socials belting out sick riffs on a multi-scale marvel? They’re getting quite popular in today’s world of advanced math rock and technical lead playing. The good news is that Cort have served up a model that makes this intimidating avenue of instruments accessible to everyone: the KX307MS.

It has all the essentials for prog metal: powerful ProgBar pickups, extended range, and a multi-scale design for virtuoso playing. It’s a superb choice for anyone wanting to try out a seven-string MS guitar, without breaking the bank on a higher-end bigger name brand.

On top of that, Cort’s well-earned reputation for solid, yet admittedly plain, guitars means you’re getting a workhorse that can stand up to regular performing and recording duties.


3. Schecter Omen-8 8-String

Schecter Omen-8 8-String, Walnut SatinKey features

  • Eight-string extended range
  • Rosewood fretboard
  • Schecter Diamond Plus pickups

Pros

  • Delivers the powerful, aggressive thump of an eight-string guitar without stretching your budget
  • Schecter’s neck design and X-jumbo fret sizes make the Omen-8 a good intro to eight-stringed electrics
  • Hardtail string-thru bridge keeps maintenance manageable and intonation on-point

Cons

  • Eight strings make the fretboard much wider and more difficult to reach across than that of a six-string – so it may be uncomfortable for players with smaller hands

If you’re the kind of player who looks at seven-strings and thinks, “That just isn’t quite enough”, then perhaps the Omen-8 is for you! As one of the most affordable eight-string models on the market (with a decent name behind it), this Schecter is a fantastic option for any guitarist looking to add an ultra-extended range instrument to their arsenal.

A nice and slim neck makes handling the mammoth fretboard a little easier, and Schecter’s powerhouse pickups give you a clean string separation, in addition to plenty of heat to make chugs and power chords stand out.

Where the Omen-8 really shines is in its ability to drop tune with ease – if you want to explore sludgy, grindy, and doomy sounds then an extended range is where it’s at. With its top string starting at F#, you’re immediately close to bass guitar territory, and so can conjure up all manner of thunderous, subterranean sonics whilst still having access to the bright palette of the D, G, B, and high E strings.


4. Fender Jim Root Telecaster

Fender Jim Root Telecaster, Flat WhiteKey features

  • Classic Telecaster body
  • EMG 81/60 pickups
  • Locking tuners and a flat hardtail string-through bridge

Pros

  • An understated but highly attractive design combines Fender elegance with Jim Root menace
  • From crunchy nu-metal Slipknot riffs to pounding thrash onslaughts, this signature can handle a variety of high-octane metal styles
  • Excellent specifications and top-class Fender build quality promise a guitar that’s reliable, night after night

Cons

  • Vintage Telecaster style and active EMG tones might not suit all tastes

Jim Root’s signature Fenders have been quite a hit in the metal world – and quite rightly! With three of electric guitardom’s most iconic designs – the Telecaster, Stratocaster, and Jazzmaster – his guitars gave metalheads a stripped-back, minimalist look while wielding maximum power.

We’ve opted for the Telecaster, as it’s hard to beat the original electric guitar for authenticity… Plus, there’s something satisfying about seeing Telecasters metallified. The Fender Jim Root Telecaster is the perfect blend of classic design and modern metal features.

Jim Root’s awe-inspiring axe features the mighty EMG 81/60 combo, delivering biting and crushing tones ideal for high-gain settings. The sleek ebony fretboard and spartan aesthetic mean business, providing a clean and focused look that emphasizes performance.

A flat hardtail string-through bridge and locking tuners ensure ultra-reliable performance, even for downtuned sets, while the 12” radius fingerboard is comfortable for both sweep-picked solos and brutal nu-metal rhythms.

The satin body finish and black hardware complete the look, making the Jim Root Telecaster an understated yet powerful instrument. It’s designed to let your riffs do the talking, providing a reliable and visually striking platform for your metal endeavors. Whether you’re into Slipknot’s crunchy nu-metal or pounding thrash metal, this guitar is built to handle it all.


5. G4M 734 Pro Baritone Electric Guitar

G4M 734 Pro Baritone Electric Guitar, Black Burl BurstKey features

  • High-output ceramic humbuckers
  • One-of-a-kind unique burl finish
  • Graphtech Nubone nut

Pros

  • Baritone configuration at an affordable price
  • Higher output passive humbuckers enable crushing and powerful tones
  • Reverse headstock and baritone scale helps keep drop tunings stable

Cons

  • Baritone length may not be comfortable for all players

Looking to get that meaty, aggressive, and thunderous tone that permeates so much of modern metal? The G4M 734 Pro Baritone may just be your answer. Well, an affordable, cost-effective answer at least! Its baritone scale length, reverse headstock, and high-output pickups make this model a top choice for anyone looking to replicate the throaty and boomy drop-tuned rumbles in today’s heavy music.

A poplar burl top keeps the aesthetic interesting without veering too strongly into the metal vibe, while its one-piece Canadian maple C-shaped neck keeps things comfy on the riffing side. Complete with green Luminlay side dots to ensure visibility on the darkest stages (a premium feature usually reserved for higher-end instruments), the G4M bari is a true metal workhorse.


6. Harlem X Electric Guitar by Gear4music

Harlem X Electric Guitar by Gear4music, BlackKey features

  • Angular design and metal aesthetic
  • Gloss black finish
  • 1x open humbucker and 1x closed humbucker

Pros

  • Affordable, with an included gig bag and 1/4” cable – a great metal option for those on a tight budget
  • Locking tremolo system allows for extreme pitch bends
  • Dark metal aesthetic will fit in with the meanest crowds

Cons

  • Locking tremolo system isn’t as useful to players more interested in rhythm rather than lead-playing

The Harlem X has everything a budding metalhead needs: sleek looks, twin humbucking pickups, and a locking trem system that’s able to divebomb to the extremes. We start our list with this entry-level model as it’s got those key ingredients to fit in with most metal subgenres, on top of a solid build quality that’ll keep your playing in-tune through a set.

The locking nut will help keep your pitch tight during bends and vibratos, and the shallow “C” contour neck provides a comfy grip in every position, helping your chords and lead lines flow with ease. Including a gig bag and 1/4” instrument cable, the Harlem X is an ideal starting point for any guitarist looking to dip their toes into the metal world.


7. JET Guitars JS-400 HH Rosewood

JET Guitars JS-400 HH Rosewood, Matte BlackKey features

  • Two high-output humbuckers
  • Premium rosewood fretboard
  • Modern C-shaped maple neck with 9.5” radius and bone nut

Pros

  • Comfy and slim “S” style body shape
  • Higher-output ceramic humbuckers offer tight and defined tones
  • Single volume control keeps tone manipulation simple

Cons

  • Lack of a tremolo makes it less appealing for those needing extreme pitch-bend solos

An all-rounder metal debutant with quality components, an easy-playing feel, and a sleek black style to cap it off, JET guitars’ JS-400 is a fantastic option for lovers of the “S” shape and heavy music style.

If you’re on a tighter budget, the JS-400 offers you a lot of bang for your buck with little compromise. For starters, it’s rare to see rosewood fretboards, roasted maple necks, and genuine bone nuts at this price point. Paired with a couple of ceramic-covered humbuckers, it’s got the cut and brightness needed to separate out the strings when playing with huge amounts of gain and distortion.


8. Cort X100

Cort X100, Open Pore Black Cherry BurstKey features

  • Cort Powersound pickup set
  • Vintage style six-screw tremolo bridge
  • Meranti body and hard maple neck

Pros

  • Vintage-style tremolo allows for fun pitch bends without the hassle of locking systems
  • Cort Powersound humbuckers deliver gnarly high-output tones
  • 16” fretboard radius is great for drop-tuned barre chords and expressive solos

Cons

  • Open pore finish and vintage elements might not be metal enough for some

Cort’s entry-level offering, the X100, has all the metal chops you need to succeed. It’s a great option for newer players or those on a budget who want an instrument that can hold its own in a metal ensemble but that’s also capable of lighter genres like rock and blues.

A pair of Cort Powersound humbuckers have all the heft you need to get booming distortion tones, while a vintage-style tremolo enables all kinds of whammy experimentation. Join that with a hard rock maple neck, and you’ve got a guitar that’s ready for frequent gigging and reliable performances, all at a price that belies its high quality.


9. Jackson X Series Rhoads RRX24

Jackson X Series Rhoads RRX24, Winter CamoKey features

  • Classic Rhoads V-shape
  • Ultra-fast slim neck with compound radius fretboard
  • Seymour Duncan Blackout humbuckers

Pros

  • Has all the metal virtuoso features at a great price point
  • Blackout pickups can handle everything from hair metal to djent
  • Floyd Rose tremolo system executes flawless pitch bends

Cons

  • Angular V-shape and locking tremolo system aren’t the most practical things for strictly at-home players

No list of metal guitars would be complete without a Rhoads V. Angular, pointy, and just as likely to cut its players as it is to cut through a mix, the Rhoads is an all-time classic for any metal genre.

Nowadays, Jackson produces a Rhoads for any level of budget, from entry-level to Custom Shop extravagance. We’ve chosen the slightly above middle-of-the-road Jackson X series Rhoads for its useful features, mouth-watering looks, and solid build quality.

Its key features include a pair of Seymour Duncan Blackout pickups that can produce devastating tones, a Floyd Rose trem system, and the classic Jackson compound radius fretboard for a comfy fretting experience.

Those Seymour Duncans are ideal for any player who prefers the feel and vibe of passive pickups over active, and also any player that doesn’t want the hassle of carrying spare batteries around. They’re ideal for chunky metalcore rhythms or spiky lead lines – solos that you can further spice up with divebombs and whammies from the locking Floyd Rose bridge.

Top all that off with the iconic Sharktooth inlays and a reverse headstock to keep the drop-tunings even more stable, and you’ve got one of the best value metal guitars out there.


10. PRS SE 277 Baritone

PRS SE 277 Baritone, Charcoal BurstKey features

  • Classic PRS body shape with a baritone scale length
  • 85/15 ‘S’ pickups
  • Premium rosewood fingerboard inlaid with the hallmark PRS birds

Pros

  • PRS’ 85/15 “S” pickups translate well to heavy distortion and gain
  • Push/pull coil split allows for chiming bright tones on demand
  • PRS plate-style string-through bridge keeps a rock-solid intonation and enhances resonance

Cons

  • Classic rock appearance might not be metal enough for some!

Next on the list is another baritone offering – this time from renowned quality merchants Paul Reed Smith. The PRS SE 277 (named after its 27.7” scale length) baritone model presents a seriously well-built and designed guitar at an attractive price, capable of everything from mellow riffing to all-out djent destruction.

We’ve picked this baritone as it brings a lot to the table for any metal maniac: a sleek charcoal burst finish fits in with the moody metal scene, its bari scale length makes dark and doomy tunings a breeze while keeping a six-string design, and its sought-after 85/15 “S” pickups can voice a wide variety of genres without becoming scratchy or harsh.

Coil-splitting might not sound like a feature that’d be a priority to a metalhead, but there are plenty of contrasting clean sections where the chime and brightness of single coil tones can lift a guitar track out of a song. And of course, you can run them coil-split through distortion too… if you’re into that sort of thing.

If you value refined aesthetics and a top-class construction out of the box, it’s definitely a guitar to consider.


11. Hagstrom Fantomen

Hagstrom Fantomen, White GlossKey features

  • Lundgren-designed humbuckers
  • Integrated coil-splitting feature with push/pull controls
  • Premium gloss finish and pearl block inlays

Pros

  • An unusual, striking design that’ll stand out from the crowd of usual metal silhouettes
  • Lungren-designed pickups provide a crystal-clear response and can be coil-split for extra versatility in clean sections
  • Classic-style TOM bridge and die-cast tuners keep maintenance simple while also ensuring pin-point accurate intonation

Cons

  • Eccentric style and lower-output humbuckers might not be to every metal enthusiast’s taste

Want something a little different? This Hagstrom Fantomen provides an offset and funky character, in addition to plenty of power to compete at high distortion levels. Its white gloss finish and pearl block inlays are super attractive, while an alnico-5 bridge pickup has plenty of heat to give your notes a satisfying punch.

A lower-output alnico-2 neck pickup lets you roll into classic rock or creamy rhythm sections, and what’s more, both pickups can be split to get spritely single coil sounds for your clean sections. It’s not your typical pick for high-octane metal riffing, but its unique character and alnico pickups mean it can easily stand up to the competition in many metal genres.

If you’re looking for hyper-clear and crushing tones, then Hagstom’s alnico pickups aren’t that. But if you want to stand out from the pack, the Fantomen’s cool shape is one to consider.


12. Epiphone Matt Heafy Origins Les Paul Custom 7-String

Epiphone Matt Heafy Origins Les Paul Custom 7-String, Bone WhiteKey features

  • Trivium’s Matt Heafy signature, a rare extended range Les Paul
  • SpeedTaper D shape neck profile
  • Active Fishman Fluence pickups with multiple voicings

Pros

  • Get the vintage feel of a Les Paul with tight, super-clear active Fishman sounds
  • Ideal for metalcore riffing and chunky drop-tuned rhythms
  • Locking tuners and an Epiphone LockTone TOM bridge keep intonation and tuning secure and stable

Cons

  • Signature instrument that might not appeal to players seeking a more modern aesthetic

Matt Heafy is a veteran of the metalcore scene, responsible for some iconic breakdown riffs and glorious gut-punching chugs. His signature Les Paul is the perfect way to get those tones – but why have we selected it as one of the best metal guitars?

For one thing, its extended range offers something above the cheaper Epiphone Les Paul Prophecy that’s only available in a six-string configuration. The seven-string setup allows for lower tunings and broader tonal possibilities, making it ideal for modern metal genres that demand extended range and versatility.

Additionally, a set of signature Fishman Fluence MKH pickups voice Heafy’s crushing tones with remarkable clarity. These pickups come with multiple voicings and coil-split functionality, providing a wide range of tonal options from vintage PAF-style tones to modern, high-gain sounds. This flexibility is crucial for achieving the dynamic range needed in metalcore and other heavy genres.

The SpeedTaper D shape neck profile ensures a smooth and fast playing experience, perfect for executing slick metal riffs and complex solos. The locking tuners and Epiphone LockTone TOM bridge keep intonation and tuning rock solid, even during the most intense performances.

While the signature nature of this instrument might not appeal to players who prefer a more modern or non-signature aesthetic, for fans of Matt Heafy and those who appreciate a blend of vintage Les Paul charm with cutting-edge metal features, the Epiphone Matt Heafy Origins Les Paul Custom 7-String is an exceptional choice.


13.  ESP LTD EC-1000 QM

ESP LTD EC-1000 QM, See Thru Purple SBKey features

  • Quilted maple top
  • Classic EMG 81/60 active humbucker pickup combo
  • Locking tuners and locking TonePros TOM bridge

Pros

  • Loaded with high-spec appointments and aesthetics, a no-compromise metal machine
  • Easy and comfortable to play, with active EMG pickups that allow versatility through a number of metal genres
  • Exceptionally easy to maintain and reliable thanks to locking hardware

Cons

  • EMG pickups are known for a distinctive tone, if you’re not a fan then consider another instrument!

Yes, it’s another single-cut body style in the lineup, but the popularity of ESP’s Eclipse line should speak for itself. In particular, the 1000 tier of the Eclipse boasts top-of-the-line hardware and appointments, in addition to a luscious, quilted maple top and finish. All this premium attention creates a guitar that’s worth every penny – to every kind of metalhead!

This EC-1000 comes equipped with the EMG 81/60 combo that delivers a wrathful sound with a burning intensity. It’s close to the quintessential Hetfield Metallica sound and is great for thrash and power metal.

As for playability, the classic EC shape is super comfy to hold and pairs with ESP’s super thin U-shaped neck for speedy traversals around the fretboard. Combine that with plentiful access to the high frets and you’ve got the perfect tool for crunchy down picked rhythms or soaring lead lines.

It is quite purple though, so whether or not the EC-1000 QM is for you is really going to hinge on your personal taste and aesthetic.


14. Sterling SBMM Majesty

Sterling SBMM Majesty, Siberian SapphireKey features

  • Innovative integrated boost circuit
  • Extended range instrument with slender neck design
  • Custom John Petrucci inlays and striking offset body

Pros

  • Built for shredders and prog metal enjoyers – the ultimate virtuoso machine
  • Traditional tremolo system is perfect for players who don’t like locking models
  • Sterling seven-string pickups provide excellent note clarity for solos and lead passages

Cons

  • If you aren’t into Dream Theatre style soloing then some of the Majesty’s features might be excessive

One of the stalwarts of progressive metal and complex instrumental compositions, John Petrucci’s signature instruments are an ideal platform for metalheads who are pushing the boundaries.

In particular, the Majesty possesses stellar looks, a growling set of humbucker pickups, and an integrated boost circuit to give your notes a hyper-clear punch that cuts through a mix. Its eye-catching offset design is not only intriguing but also maintains an ideal balance and weight distribution while you’re shredding.

Together with finer details like advanced pickup switching to ensure no delay when selecting pickups, attractive JP inlays and an ergonomic neck design for total fret access, you’ve got the ideal tool for creating monstrous rhythms and mind-melting leads.


15. Ormsby Hype 7

Ormsby Hype 7, Icy CoolKey features

  • World-class multi-scale technology
  • Carefully selected Nunchucker and De La Crème pickups
  • Custom Hipshot bridge

Pros

  • An extended range that stands out sonically, visually, and for its high-quality
  • The perfect guitar to back up your shredding and speed-playing skills
  • A custom string-through hardtail bridge keeps maintenance under control

Cons

  • It’s suitable for a specific type of player and audience, and if it’s not for you, it’s really not for you

The Ormsby Hype is peak innovation and style distilled into a super-cool extended-range guitar. Featuring world-class multi-scale technology, this Ormsby serves up a unique playing experience that enhances both comfort and performance for you advanced shredsters.

The Nunchucker and De La Crème pickups are carefully selected to provide a vast array of tones, from clean and articulate to heavy and aggressive, making it a versatile instrument for various playing styles and genres outside of metal.

On top of its tones, a custom Hipshot bridge ensures that intonation and tuning stability are never compromised, even during the most demanding performances. This is particularly beneficial for players who require precision and reliability in their instruments.

Visually, the Icy Cool finish and flame maple veneer make the Hype 7 stand out on any stage. It’s a guitar built for speed and shredding, with a high-quality construction that guarantees durability and excellent playability.

However, it’s important to note that this guitar caters to a specific audience; its features and design might not appeal to everyone. If you’re not into the extended range or the unique aesthetic, it might not be the right fit for you. But for those who seek a powerful, aggressive instrument with a modern edge, the Hype 7 is a stellar choice.

How to choose the best metal guitar for you

Pickups

Pickups play a pivotal role in defining your guitar’s tone. High-output humbuckers are favoured in metal for their ability to handle distortion and produce aggressive, powerful sounds.

Active pickups, such as those by EMG or Fishman Fluence, offer high output and clarity, making them ideal for cutting through the mix in high-gain settings. Passive pickups can provide a more dynamic and organic tone, preferred by some for their versatility and nuanced response.


Number of strings

The number of strings significantly impacts your playing style and sound range. While six-string guitars are versatile and familiar, seven- and eight-string guitars offer extended lower ranges, enabling deeper tunings and more complex riffs. These additional strings are beneficial in genres like djent and progressive metal, where extended range and intricate playing styles are common.


Multi-scale/fanned frets

Multi-scale or fanned fret guitars provide ergonomic benefits and improved string tension. The varied scale lengths across the fretboard offer better intonation and tension balance, especially useful for extended-range guitars. This design helps maintain clarity and tuning stability, even with very low tunings, making it ideal for technical and progressive metal styles.


Body shape

The body shape affects both the guitar’s playability and aesthetic. Aggressive, angular designs like the V or Explorer are iconic in metal and often provide better access to higher frets. Ergonomic shapes like the Strat or Superstrat are also popular for their comfort and versatility, making them suitable for extended playing sessions and complex lead work.


Hardtail vs. locking tremolo

Choosing between a hardtail bridge and a locking tremolo system depends on your playing style. Hardtail bridges offer stability and simplicity, ideal for rhythm playing and maintaining tuning. Locking tremolos, like the Floyd Rose, allow for dramatic pitch bends and vibrato effects without losing tuning stability, making them perfect for lead guitarists who use a lot of dive bombs and expressive techniques.

G4M 734 guitars

Brands to look out for

When it comes to metal guitars, you want a brand with a reputation for high-quality, innovative, and extremely robust instruments that can take any level of ferocious gig and boot out some powerful, crushing tones.


ESP

Known for high-quality builds and heavy tones, ESP guitars are favoured by many metal legends. Their models often feature active pickups and sleek designs, perfect for aggressive playing styles.


Schecter

Schecter offer a range of metal-focused guitars at various price points. Known for their durability and powerful sound, Schecter guitars are great for both beginners and seasoned players.


Ibanez

Renowned for their fast necks and versatile pickups, Ibanez guitars are ideal for shredding. Models like the RG series are staples in the metal community.


Jackson

A favourite among metal players for their aggressive designs and playability. Jackson guitars often feature compound radius fretboards and high-output pickups, making them perfect for technical playing and solos.

What else do I need for a strong metal setup?

A great metal guitar is just one part of your setup. There are a few other essential components you’ll need to complete your rig.

Firstly, a high-gain amplifier is crucial for achieving the heavy, saturated tones that define metal music. Brands like Mesa/Boogie, Peavey, and Marshall offer amps specifically designed for metal, featuring multiple channels and extensive EQ controls to shape your sound.

Secondly, you’ll need an overdrive pedal to boost your signal and add sustain, making solos and riffs stand out. Popular choices include the Ibanez Tube Screamer and the Maxon OD808, both of which are known for their ability to tighten up high-gain tones and add clarity to your playing.

Finally, durable picks are essential for metal playing as they withstand the aggressive picking techniques used in this genre. Picks like the Dunlop Jazz III are favoured for their precision and control, helping you achieve fast, accurate picking and powerful strumming.

Investing in high-quality gear ensures that your performance remains consistent, and your tone stays sharp, whether you’re practising at home, recording in the studio, or performing live.

Jackson Pro Plus Series Rhoads RR24, Deep Black

FAQs

What is the best type of guitar for metal?

The best guitar for metal often features high-output humbuckers, a fast neck, and a stable bridge. Popular choices include the Ibanez RG series, ESP LTD models, and Jackson Soloist guitars, known for their heavy tones, smooth playability, and reliable hardware, perfect for aggressive playing.


Is the Stratocaster good for metal?

While not traditionally associated with metal, the Stratocaster can be great for metal if equipped with high-output pickups. Models like the Fender Jim Root Stratocaster feature active EMG pickups and a hardtail bridge, making them suitable for heavy tones and fast playability.


What guitar pick should I use for metal?

For metal, use a thick, durable pick like the Dunlop Tortex or Jazz III. These picks offer precision and control, essential for fast, aggressive playing. Thicker picks (1.0mm or more) provide better grip and attack, enhancing your speed and articulation in metal riffs and solos.

Final thoughts

We hope this in-depth guide to the best metal guitars has given you some options and sound advice in your search for a metal guitar, but if you’re still not sure about any of the information provided, leave us a comment below and we’ll answer as quickly as we can!

If you can take away anything though, it’s that there are plenty of viable options for every level of guitarist, in every price category. Regardless of your budget, there’s an axe out there that’s ready to chug and shred!

 

Content Writer (Guitars)

Mark has been a guitar aficionado for around twenty years. A lover of all things 6-string, he spends his days putting pen-to-paper about all manner of interesting instruments. From entry level Squiers to the most coveted Custom Shop desires, Mark's written about them.

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